FaunaPhotonics Danish Biodiversity Project 2022

2022-07-27T12:59:45+02:00

FaunaPhotonics is Copenhagen-based and is running a biodiversity initiative in summer and autumn 2022. We place sensors around Denmark to collect insect observations and biodiversity data. The data can be accessed through FaunaPhotonics’ customer portal and can be compared – with other habitats and locations or at the same location during a time period. With this, we can identify effective interventions that enhance biodiversity.

FaunaPhotonics Danish Biodiversity Project 20222022-07-27T12:59:45+02:00

Syngenta and FaunaPhotonics praise biodiversity initiatives and ideas present in Danish agriculture.

2022-03-28T14:28:55+02:00

Biodiversity is on everyone’s agenda these days and for a good reason. For the past couple of years media has been full of stories about insect decline, fewer insects on car windows in the summer and problems getting enough pollinators for agricultural crops. According to the 2019 Global Risks Report, biodiversity loss and ecosystem collapse is considered one of the ten greatest risks facing society today.

Syngenta and FaunaPhotonics praise biodiversity initiatives and ideas present in Danish agriculture.2022-03-28T14:28:55+02:00

Industrial PhD – Biodiversity

2022-03-22T15:00:30+01:00

In January 2020 our data analyst Klas Rydhmer, who has been part of the company since 2016, began an industrial PhD with the working title: Development of automated and non-intrusive monitoring of pollinators and insect biodiversity using optical sensor.

Industrial PhD – Biodiversity2022-03-22T15:00:30+01:00

Insect biodiversity – Why should farmers care?

2022-03-28T14:05:39+02:00

Biodiversity is on everyone’s agenda these days and for a good reason. According to the 2019 Global Risks Report, biodiversity loss and ecosystem collapse is considered one of the ten greatest risks facing society today (5). Since 1970, the world has lost 60% of its global vertebrate population, and more than 40% of insect species are declining rapidly (6). Seilbold et al. reported that the decline in flying insects are thought to be caused by human land use (2). Landscape simplification can lead to the decrease of ecosystem service-providing organisms (4).

Insect biodiversity – Why should farmers care?2022-03-28T14:05:39+02:00
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